Gradual Germination

 I have a lot of difficulty sleeping. It’s never easy to fall asleep and staying asleep is a nightmare (pun intended), as I am plagued with terribly violent dreams from my PTSD. My doctor has also told me that people on the spectrum often have symptoms of insomnia because of the sensory problems as well as from disruptions in melatonin and one’s circadian rhythm.

Sensory processing problems, for me at least, do seem to peak at nighttime. I think this is largely because they tend to build over the course of the day, like a crescendo in a musical piece that finally breaks into the final cord (or some sort of sensory overload meltdown) at night. I end the vast majority of my days with a terrible headache. My tolerance for sensory stimuli is completely exhausted by 5:00pm. Even a tiny sound—a gust of wind at the window, breathing, my own audible heartbeat against the mattress—drives me bananas. These sounds amplify with each passing second. An uneven whir of the fan (the infamous “pulsing” as it’s known in our home) is my nemesis, its rhythm paving paths of irritation on my cortex. I hate the slightest flicker of light; my poor husband fumbles around in the dark trying to get things. Even his cellphone glow (and he has the old, pre-smartphone type with a tiny screen!) bothers me.  My skin is the worst offender. I won’t even get into that right now because my intention for this post is rapidly getting buried among my sensory complaints!

Needless to say, I employ a strategically designed, carefully rehearsed sleep routine every single night, with the goal of “optimizing sleep hygiene” for better rest. Still, it’s far from good sleep and even further from flawless, which is why I find myself up every morning between 2:40 and 3:40am with a mind that is ready to start the day. As for my body, sometimes it leads the charge and is raring to go, while other times it feels as it should at 2:40am: like cement has encased it.

The other morning, I came down to find the flower pictured in this post in its full blooming glory. The bulb was gifted to me by my mother-in-law for Christmas. While I love flowers, plants, trees, and gardening, I am quite far from having that coveted “green thumb.” Historically, it seems like all my stuff initially grows and then, suddenly, completely succumbs to some sort of dramatic death. (To be fair, that was usually in the mouth of our curious Siamese cat growing up, who seemed to have a constant hankering for my “experiments” growing beans, seeds, and even moldy bread for a Girl Scout badge!)

Anyway, I stuck the bulb in the little pot, plunged it in the provided soil cake, watered it once, and put it on the shelf behind the TV. Oh, but she grew!

Without water for 9 weeks (only the initial wetting of the soil cake), without adequate light, without the TLC my plant deserved, she blossomed. My point in sharing this seemingly boring story is to make an analogy. Even though it’s hardly debatable that I deprived my plant from the things it needed, it survived. It thrived, in fact! The plant had everything it needed inside of its cells. It grew strong roots that are wildly trying to escape their plastic cage; it grew a tall, thick, luscious stem with healthy leaves; and deep vibrant red flowers with silky petals. Had I provided more water and light, I imagine it may have been an easier journey towards maturation, and perhaps today’s growth state would have been reached sooner. However, for nine quiet weeks, my plant used its own resources to figure out how to not only survive, but to thrive and express its beauty. We are much the same way. All of us have an incredible internal strength, a resilience to grow and succeed even if the stakes are against us, even when society, science, health, etc. appear unfavorable for us to prevail. Much like the plant, while there may be an optimal environment or helpful constituents for our survival, we carry within the knowledge, the power, the awareness of our needs, and the drive to grow into strong individuals.

Sometimes situations don’t feel fair. We look to blame luck, “God,” society, etc., and frankly, I think a lot of situations in our world aren’t fair (too many to name), but my hope is that we can all be like my plant, able to persist, so that someday, when it’s least expected, there is something beautiful that we are quietly (or boldly) projecting and breathing into the spaces around us. While we toil away and face challenges and pain, we are laying each strong cell in a calculated and purposeful arrangement, ripe with fortitude and care, into a structure—a life—that has meaning and value.

 

 

Oh, and I do plan to water this plant! Just because she can survive on her own, doesn’t mean she should have to. Be someone’s light and water: loving and supporting someone is never the wrong choice.

 

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