Am I in a Wax Museum?

The emergence of my nonverbal behavior always frightens me. When my ability to verbally communicate is swallowed, I feel powerless. Our world is not set up to facilitate nonverbal communication. This makes me feel like I’m at a dead end when I’m in a situation where I’ve lost my voice.

Sometimes, I’m not even aware that this has happened. I just stare stunned, nearly catatonic, blinking, perhaps nodding (if I’m lucky), otherwise, just like a puppet crafted without a mouth. The world moves around me and I feel like I’m standing still, the central axis pole of a merry-go-round with all the people and horses, music and lights bobbing up and down with carefree purpose around me. Sometimes I just watch in awe, oblivious to my nonparticipation. Other times, I feel like I’m my own statue in a wax museum, standing in a soundproof glass case around the action. The walls are sometimes a one-way mirror: I know people can see me, but they can’t hear me; or other times, I feel like I see everything but I’m concealed to the masses.

When I’m aware that I’m in a nonverbal spell, I feel like a scared child. I want to tuck myself into a ball and be carried away by a parent to safety. I want to be hugged and shielded. I become afraid that I will not stand up for what I want, or especially for what I need. Perhaps it’s my trauma background, but I sometimes get anxious that I’ll agree to things I don’t want to do. I’m not specifically referring to physical/trauma things, but less severe things that I still don’t want to do. It’s happened before: I’ve silently agreed to job offers, plans or commitments with others, giving people things that I didn’t want to part with, helping people in situations that seemed unsafe because they asked for help. A small shrug or nod “yes” seems to be a defense mechanism when I’m stunned or overwhelmed and can’t talk, even when I don’t want to agree. Thankfully, doctors usually have their patients’ best interests in mind, so that’s not typically an issue there, but I don’t get my medical questions answered, which usually sets my already-pervasive anxiety into a consuming tailspin! But like I said, I can’t take steps forward if I don’t even know they need to be taken, so this is a good starting place. I am now operating from a place of increased awareness of this issue so I can begin trying to navigate these aphasiac spells with a game plan that makes sense, which will hopefully instill some much-needed confidence to handle normal activities like medical appointments.

 

 

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