Healing?

Good news! My body may be finally stepping in and trying to heal my foot. We are going to postpone the surgery until May 11th, to give it a few more weeks. I’m happy about this for two reasons: there’s the relief that the surgery isn’t tomorrow morning (which makes it feel less real because it is less imminent and there’s a chance I won’t need it at all) and it makes me feel like my body, even though weakened in many regards, may have some inherent healing ability hidden within it after all. I also started to be overcome with nervousness about the general anesthesia required for the procedure.  I had no idea that it meant I was not going to be breathing on my own and would have tubes down my throat. In the past 24 hours, I’ve done enough research to convince myself that logically, this is safe and would be uneventful, but emotionally, it still triggers fear.

So, here’s to hoping that my body decides to heal this thing up on its own. While that’s certainly far and above what I’d prefer, I will face whatever outcome we reach on the 11th with as much stoicism and positivity as I can muster.

Strength Training

I have been lifting weights again and strength training for exactly two months. Although this has nothing to do with autism, when I started my blog, I decided not to put constraints on myself regarding what I needed to think about or write about. This blog tends to be a space where I can simply mull over and express some of the many thoughts and experiences that confuse, frustrate, excite, scare, or otherwise impact me. As mentioned, strength training also has been a big bear I wanted to retackle, after going cold turkey post-attack for a couple years. Once a huge part of my identity and an integral source of joy in my life, it became one of many things I could no longer face. Except for running, I became a voyeur of the fitness world, as the mere thought of strength training made my stomach flip.

Not anymore. I’ve been training. I wouldn’t necessarily classify this training by tacking on any adjectives like “hard” or “serious,” because I’ve tried to take a low-key approach (and I have a broken foot!), but I would say my practice has been dedicated, courageous, and empowering. And fun. For as much as I’ve been trying to hold my ground above the depression abyss, any little source of happiness must be coveted like prized possession. Plus, it’s been effective. I’m actually back up to all of my old benchmarks and lifting at least as much—and in some cases even more—weight than in my prime strength training days in NYC as a full-time trainer. I never thought I’d get my body back up to that level of physical strength because it just hasn’t seemed as resilient anymore and I’ve had so many health problems, not to mention I was basically working out all day then through my job. 

It’s interesting because I have also mentioned that I avoid looking in the mirror. While I’ve gotten better and continue my daily practice of positive self-talk, this is just to the reflection of my face. My body is a different story: I don’t look at it. Until very recently, the weather had been cold enough that I was always bundled up anyway, so I never even really “accidentally” saw it. Sometimes I feel like this is actually healthier than it sounds for me personally, because I’ve hated my body unwaveringly for so long that it can be more beneficial to ignore its appearance altogether than risk critiquing it and hating it. I hope this is not the case for most people. I even shower in the dark. 

With all that said, I’ve looked at my arms lately. In fact, I not only looked casually at them, I decided to flex them. Boy there’s a lot of muscle trapped in a little arm! My scrawny atrophied arms of the past couple of years have reverted back to my healthy and muscular arms of my younger twenties. I’m not sure how it makes me feel, maybe surprised, maybe partly (ashamedly) nervous that my attacker’s words will ring true (that having muscles and a strong body made me attractive, and thus a target). Most of the time, my logical brain assures me this is not true, but I still have to fend off the occasional worries. The good news is that I’m not repulsed by my changing appearance, so that’s a start. I hope that confidence finds her way to quietly seep in, gathering a groundswell presence while I’m busy focusing on other things, until one day, she is big and loud enough for me to notice her secure hold in my mind. From there, she can slowly open the gates for the self-hatred, fear, and trauma to begin to recede and my mind, heart, and body will start finding more peace.

A Visit

My oldest sister came over today. Even though I’ve moved closer to home, I don’t see her often: she’s busy, I’m anti-social. In fact, when she got here, she commented that she couldn’t remember the last time we hung out alone. I was hoping that my nervousness was not as palpable as it felt. I guess that’s one of the weird things about me—perhaps it’s an autism thing—nervousness to see my own sister. She’s known me my whole life, yet my own social anxiety is so crippling that I fear seeing her. It’s also likely a product of times in my life I have been judged or teased, even bullied, and certainly made to feel even more different than I am by other people. Even though she’s family and I’m confident she wouldn’t treat me that way, I have trouble separating fears induced by past experiences in disastrous social situations over likely safe, and even pleasant new ones. This is another instance where I often let self-limiting anxieties hinder my happiness. Not only do I end up missing out on a source of love and joy, but it’s also unfair to wrongfully project the behavior of behavior of a handful of spiteful people onto my notions of everyone.

I think one of the special qualities about family members or true friends that you don’t have to “do” anything when you spend time with one another. Because I am basically immobile with my fracture and carry all sorts of limitations normally, ranging from severe food allergies to sensory challenges, there isn’t much I can do right now anyway. Ashleigh didn’t care. She didn’t pressure me to go out, provide any sort of entertainment, or make me feel like I was boring her to death. She just sat and talked with me, asked how she could help, tidied up my messes and mishaps, made me laugh, and distracted me from the loneliness and pains I’m going through. She regaled me with humorous bits from our favorite shows and talked to me like an equal, not a little sister.

Ashleigh has her own challenges and doesn’t claim to know how to help me with mine, but we seem to have a tacit understanding that we’ve got each other’s backs and admire the courage and strength that we both engage against the struggles we face, including the necessarily hard work of self-improvement and self-understanding. I look at her and see someone who is quite different than me, but also someone who, just like when I was young, I aspire to be more alike. Especially over the past couple of years, she embodies such grace, such resilience, and such clemency.

Even though she didn’t stay long, it was a bright spot in my day and a welcome break from work and even from my usual routine that I so tightly cling to. When I was talking with my husband after she left, he asked how the visit went. I caught myself saying, “surprisingly well.” Again, reminding me that I had the preconceived notion or fear that it likely wouldn’t. He asked me why I thought it went well or what I liked about it. All I replied was: I felt like I had a real friend.

The Mighty

Exiting news! My first blog post—the one that bravely kicked off this blog (if I may step out of my normally modest shoes for a second and toot my own horn!)—was featured by The Mighty and is available on their website. The Mighty is a big, supportive online community for those with or affected by any variety of disease or disability. The community offers not only perspectives of afflicted individuals, but also their parents, siblings, friends, etc. One thing I really admire about The Mighty is that it not only provides great resources for those with or affected by a given condition, but it gives those same individuals a platform from which to share their experiences, triumphs, and concerns, which I think is powerfully influential in altering our stereotypes and rattling our contemptuousness. The Mighty gives voices to people who may not otherwise be heard and through such sharing, shortens the distance between things that seem blatantly different. Honestly, even before I had my autism and sensory processing diagnoses, I followed The Mighty and subscribed to their weekly digests of stories and articles because I marveled at the bravery of the storytellers and found that weekly messages of some people’s hidden or invisible struggles was a good reminder of the strength of humanity and the importance of constantly exercising compassion, even through my own hurt and battles. Some stories, even if about a disease I had never heard of and certainly didn’t face, made me feel understood, simply because many of the same challenges are faced by all of us, even if they come with different names or wear different costumes.

This now reads like an advertising spot for The Mighty, which certainly wasn’t at all my intention. I guess it’s just my honest one-minute appreciation speech for my new inclusion into the community as a contributing writer. In fact, they have asked me to add new content and posts overtime, so I’m really appreciative of the opportunity to share my perspective to hopefully help some readers understand and help others feel understood.

(it’s actually the featured story on the main page this morning!)