Insomnia

Lately, I’ve been sleeping worse than my “normal,” which is already borderline unworkable. I am not aware of a definitive reason for this backslide but I need to find some modifiable causes so I can get back on track. Usually, my insomnia is a product of PTSD or generalized anxiety, physical pain, or SPD problems, and I think that all three of these factors are present in my current bout. The other night, the pungent skunk smell woke me up suddenly at 10:27 PM and I was up for the remainder of the night. I wasn’t anxious, I just could not get comfortable and settle my body back down. Strong smells give me headaches, so eventually I took some ibuprofen to try to lessen the throb through my temples, a pounding so heavy that my head was rising and falling perceptibly on my pillow with each heartbeat. Once the medicine eventually kicked in, I seemed too alert and out of sorts to return to sleep.

Most nights, joint and muscle pain is the principle offender keeping me awake. I have recently learned that I have a connective tissue disorder and an immunological disorder that interact in an (im)perfect storm, saddling me with eerily puffy joints and pain that radiates outward to overly tight and achy muscles. My entire body feels the way the ears feel after an extremely loud concert, when they continue to reverberate with the auditory ghosts of the band’s drum kit. My knees alternate hues between my normal pale skin and flushed pink with each cyclical pulse. My mom calls the crepitus and extreme tightness my Tin Man body, but unlike that jointly metal man, there’s no oilcan equivalent that can lubricate my adhesions. They seem to spontaneously resolve enough to restore enough mobility to move around after a few days of an intensified flare up. Needless to say, more often than not, my body is its own drum set at night, with different joints conversing in palpable throbs. It’s not only painful and debilitating, it’s a sensory assault that exceeds my attenuated nighttime threshold. Lately, it does seem that this pain has ratcheted up a few notches in its severity, which surely is contributing my increased sleep disturbances.

Later today, I have an appointment to revisit the rheumatologist, so hopefully I’ll muster up the courage to explain the nearly constant pain that has characterized the last month or two and then get a more workable solution.

When I can’t sleep, I think, or more accurately, my mind floods with thoughts. Lately, I’ve been reading at night. It seems that finding connection and unprecedented compression in Charlotte’s Web was a gateway to discovering my appreciation for other fiction books as well. It’s still the case that I prefer nonfiction books, particularly those pertaining to science or health and biographies and memoirs are my favorite, but I’ve found that some literature mimics a memoir in voice, story, and tone and I can get engrossed in those too, as long as I’m patient enough to get through the first few chapters. I recently devoured two stories told from the point of view of Japanese-American characters and really enjoyed those and found two others centering around characters with Asperger’s that consumed my attention. Even when I wasn’t reading, I found my mind constantly perseverating about the storyline or characters. I’m sure this is normal for your average bibliophile, but that’s not a word I’ve ever used to describe myself. Until now. This interest is starting to collect all the ingredients needed to prepare a fully cooked obsession. When I’m not able to read, I’m searching for my next book because my acceptance ratio is still pathetically low. Thank goodness the library allows for twenty reservations; I’m only able to get into about one in that group, but when I do, it’s a race to read fast enough to satisfy my curiosity and intrigue. When the last page had been turned, I find myself needing to console my little heart ache that those characters aren’t real and their stories don’t live on as something else I can follow. I think that’s one of the magnetic qualities about true biographies and memoirs. The people are real and in today’s world of many people accessible via social media, it’s easy to maintain a “relationship” with those individuals who spoke to me.

Like many times, writing has again served as a vehicle to drive me to that “eureka” place. I’m suddenly wondering if my draw to read and my excitement that certain books cultivate is actually contributing to the insomnia from a two-pronged approach. First and more topical, my doctor recommended I read at night when I can’t sleep as a sedative to lull me back to sleep. It seems this, like many things in my life, had had the opposite effect and waking up to read serves as a treat so my subconscious rouses me to provide a dopamine hit splattered on the pages of my latest read. Secondly, the plots and characters penetrate that “I care about you” part of my brain, adding to the stockpile of endless thoughts and emotional responses to mull over at night when my eyes shut and switch is turned on to process the conveyor belt of amassed ideas. If the book contains suspense, danger, or some other peril the character must face, I worry constantly about his or her successful resolution. When characters are in stressful situations, I’m in perpetual angst. When they experience loss, so do I. I carry the burden of their woes, at least until I oversee their mitigation of the strife and even at that point, I seem fixated on worrying about what might have been. Maybe I’ll have to limit the reading time to available breaks in the day like waiting for a doctor!

Again, like most of my problems, there’s no single culprit here and as with many things in life, nothing is purely good or bad. On the surface, reading is a healthy habit but as someone who lacks the ability to easily find balance, I may need to implement a system to moderate my exposure to and timing of books. One thing I’ve learned is that I’m hypersensitive to nearly everything—changes, emotions, ideas, the environment, medications, to name a few. The most successful approach to introduce something without gravely disturbing any semblance of equilibrium is careful, deliberate titration, followed by a pause to assess the impact, and then either continued slow-dosing or rerouting, it necessary. While my instinct and modus operandi is always to go full-throttle with things, ultimately, this is rarely met with the success that I hope for or that I can possibly achieve with more gradual assimilation.

Is Saying Hello a Lost Art?

For the most part, I am diligent about greeting other people that I pass while on the street or otherwise out and about. It’s not my nature to be extroverted and I certainly don’t exude a gregarious vibe, but this seems to be the polite thing to do. Yet, more and more, I find myself in the position to ask myself: Why do some people refuse to say hi or acknowledge the presence of another human? As an autistic adult—a model specimen of the extent to which people can be introverted and completely uninterested in small talk or interacting with strangers—this social behavior is particularly baffling to me. Within such socially-inept shoes, it’s hard to imagine how someone could be less “friendly” and commit a more fundamental social faux pas. These individuals who seem so committed to ignoring me may also be on the spectrum, but statistically speaking, it’s rather unlikely. I’m also not referring to one-off encounters with random passersby, but rather people I have not formally met but with whom I cross paths habitually over many months. For example, there were three people in my old neighborhood in Connecticut who refused to wave, nod, smile back, or otherwise commit to any semblance of recognizing my presence. I’d pass each of these neighbors individually, nearly every single day (literally over 300 times a year!) on my daily runs or walks while they were also on theirs. Particularly because it was often pre-dawn hours or contending with winter elements, I felt we shared a kinship in addition to the narrow roads.

My first instinct is to also ignore the oncoming pedestrian, but I’ve learned that it’s more socially acceptable and appreciated to greet the other with a simple nod, greeting hand gesture, or vocalized hello, and so I’ve conditioned myself to do so. I also would understand the situation more if I rarely saw these people or if they may not have heard or seen my acknowledgement, but I’m positive they hear and see me, especially because the more times they ignore me, the louder and more dramatic my gestures become. It’s not antagonistic or even necessarily conscious, but it seems to be my desperate attempt to have my friendliness reciprocated. The more I’m ignored, the greater my unconscious drive to convert them into a fellow greeter. With one male runner, my own feeble attempts to crack his icy exterior resulted in embarrassingly animated good mornings that even I tried to stifle. It seemed untamable. A simple smile and nod cascaded over time into a double handed frantic wiper motion and a boisterous “goooood morning!” In hindsight, my overcompensation probably smothered any hope of reciprocity but I not only seemed unable to let go of the fact that he refused to say hi, but I seemed powerless over my escalating response. This pattern played out with the two other avoidant individuals. Eventually, two of them caved: I was able to rouse a little smile and occasional hand raise (without permitting herself to hinge the hand at the wrist to wave) from one woman and the unfriendly runner also would pant out a hi or wave. The other guy was resolute in his refusal.

I think it felt worse and more confusing in this prior neighborhood because I lived in the middle of nowhere and only saw five people regularly on the roads, so to be snuffed by three of them stacked the odds against me and made me feel even weirder. I became the common denominator because what I noticed is that they often said hi to each other or other neighbors who happened to be out in their driveways as these pedestrians passed; the only pedestrian they weren’t talking to was me. It’s not even like my hyperactive gestures preemptively gave away my oddities or social awkwardness. I stuck to one of the routine greetings for at least five months before things turned more severe. That’s some 150 days to establish a basic hello.

Now I live in the center of a busy town. It’s more excusable to ignore a friendly smile or wave and more likely that one is distracted by something else. It still happens here all the time, but I’m less inclined to take it personally. After all, maybe I am the one in the wrong or at least clinging to an extinct practice. Is basic social recognition of another human a dead or dying art? Should I also revert to my comfort zone, the neurological programming installed in my birth to ignore others? It’s easy to uninstall my “updated” program, which tried to emulate the social behavior of greeting someone and run the more compatible initial version. There’s no readily apparent guidebook on this. I even Googled it and came up with nothing. My low self-esteem is inclined to imagine there’s a caveat or asterisk aside wherever such rules are written that says something like “*void if encountering a weirdo or autistic person; they don’t need a hello.” Speaking as one, that should be rewritten if it does exist. Yes, I may naturally prefer to keep entirely to myself, but it’s healthy and fulfilling to feel accepted by others, blend in with the customs, and overcome massively introverted tendencies to politely engage with others.

Of note, I do find people with all types of readily-apparent differences and disabilities seem beyond eager to engage with or glom on to me, and I gladly return the enthusiasm, so I am at least approached by some. Clearly, I’ve got more observing and research to do here.

With sincerity, I’ve been practicing a host of smiles, nods, waves, and hellos in the mirror and aloud to myself at home. I’m trying to figure out if mine are on par with “normal” people’s and how to exude a more naturally-welcoming expression. Of course, with myself as the sole judge, I’m lacking in both the informed and unbiased domains, but it’s a start. The last few walks, I’ve tested my skills on my dog and tried to take note of which ones she seems to interpret as friendlier or more exciting, demonstrated through wagging, eye contact, or even jumping. Unfortunately, she’s also biased and uniformed because she seems to love everything I say to her and is raptured by all hand gestures, but at least it’s comforting to know I’ve got one beating heart that is guaranteed to appreciate my outreach! For now, I’ll continue observing the interactions between others within earshot and eyesight, I’ll practice my own social behavior, further investigate the norms and expectations, and fight my desire to revert back to ignoring everyone until I’m confident that’s the current trend. After all, I truly do want to be camouflaged among the masses as a warm, welcoming, and friendly human being.

Self-Disclosure Reluctance

I’ve had a couple of days to mull over my job interview and my reluctance to self-disclose my spectrum diagnosis. My husband probed me to consider why I had such a strong aversion to opening up about being autistic. “Your whole point on your blog is that it’s not something shameful that you need to hide,” he argued, which is true and a feeling I stand behind. However, due to the stark incompatibility between the nature of the position I was applying for and the prevailing stereotypes about autistic people, it felt too risky to divulge. Had I been interviewing for a position that was likely unaffected by assumed autistic weaknesses or one where typical traits would behoove one’s aptitude for the job, I likely would have been more inclined to be forthcoming. Unfortunately, this was far from the case in this situation and since it is a job I am actually interested in, the risk of misconceptions counting me out of consideration seemed much greater than the reward, which was simply the ease of sharing my diagnosis honestly and avoidance of the anxiety that ensues from needing to cover it up.

I’ve mentioned that I believe one of the hallmark symptoms that society associates with autism is a vehement lack of empathy and people skills. I wholeheartedly disagree with this stereotype and continue to find that the pendulum actually swings to the far opposite side of its empathy trajectory for myself and many of the autistic women I communicate with (I don’t know enough men to weigh in on this): we are often overly empathetic to the point of discomfort (I’ve written more about this here). That said, one of the reasons this stereotype prevails is that it used to be a deficit included in the traditional diagnostic criteria.

Lacking empathy doesn’t bode well for a position in the customer service industry or for any position that involves interacting with or caring for people. A potential employer may not be aware that being on the autism spectrum doesn’t automatically mean the candidate lacks empathy, is an ineffective communicator, and will not be able to show compassion and understanding toward customers or other employees. While the employer may know someone on the spectrum whose presentation contradicts these assumed deficits, it’s less probable than the likelihood that he or she does not. Again, had I been applying for a job that required meticulous fact-checking or number crunching, it would have been a different story and I would have felt freer to disclose without incurring undesirable fallout. Autistic individuals aren’t generally thought of as people persons so a position that requires this aptitude at the forefront would not be selected as the best fit. In a pool of other qualified applicants, an autistic person carries the stigma of a significant disadvantage and would likely be immediately rejected unless there was some coveted skill or otherwise notable advantageous aspect to their candidacy. Such standout benefits and accolades do not apply to me or my application. I’m qualified and a good worker, but it’s unlikely that I’m more so than anyone else. The irony is that I am great at delivering customer service aligned with the mission and values of a company with timeliness and care. While I’m not ashamed to admit I’m a terrible communicator in many regards (particularly as it pertains to social chitchat and interpreting the meaning of verbal and nonverbal messages within their context), I’m quite adept at professional communication and adhering to and mimicking the “voice” of a company, which enables me to interact in a manner consistent with the tone and message of a company in a clear and compassionate fashion. This is one skill I’ve honed over years of dedicated observation and practice; I’ve memorized rules, patterns, and expectations surrounding the language and structure of cordial professional communication. Equally important, I’ve learned to recognize or anticipate when I need help with a necessary interaction; I’m not afraid to reach out when the situation confuses me or necessitates guidance.

All this said, disclosing my autistic diagnosis felt unnecessarily risky and likely to compromise my chances at landing the position I really wanted. It seemed the justification and explanation requisite to dispelling the myths and stereotypes associated with autism to defend my qualification would be far too extensive than the video interview warranted. Like opening a can of worms, it would usher in a lengthy discussion that just felt overwhelming.

I don’t know if I’ll get the job or not. Likewise, I won’t know if failing to disclose will have affected the outcome. In this particular situation, I do have the hunch that the employer seemed to know I was on the spectrum or that there was something “different” about me. Whether this was because he somehow was informed through careful research (my publicly-accessible information does not make it easy to deduce) or through my mannerisms or answers during our video chat, I also don’t know. There’s certainly a chance that he had no idea and I read into his question and ascribed this meaning, but the way he asked it felt otherwise. So, I will wait in hopeful anticipation and I will consider how forthcoming I want to be with my diagnosis in the future. In a perfect world, I’d self-disclose without fear of negative ramifications; we aren’t there yet and I’m not sure I’m always ready to be a trailblazer, at least not when I really want the job. I’m hoping to experiment in the future and gain confidence in owning who I am without undesirable consequences.  More importantly. I hope to dispel the myths of autistic character flaws by striving to embody the best qualities, address my weaknesses, hone my deficits into strengths, and live, work, and interact as the best version of my authentic self.

Hail

I self-soothed myself through the hailstorm last night, which, given my heightened nighttime anxiety and PTSD, I consider a notable win. I woke suddenly as it pelleted on the roof and ricocheted off the air conditioner jutting out from the window. The pinging and clanging was jarring and so unfamiliar that I was unable to categorize the noise as a weather-related anomaly, let alone specifically identify it as hail. I tucked into a ball, hugging my knees to my chest and listened. My frantic mind feared combat, an attack from an enemy, some sort of dangerous monstrosity. My muscles tightened and the inside of my closed eyelids flashed a fury of alarming reds and oranges as if staring into the rotating siren light of an emergency response vehicle. I fought the panic by trying to conjure up peaceful images and relax my muscles with each successive exhalation, employing progressive muscle relaxation techniques I’ve been practicing every morning. The sounds only got more disruptive and bewildering and although I was able to harness my worries and prevent continued escalation, I remained engrossed in concern, perched on the precipitous of sympathetic fight-or-flight.

One issue with auditory processing attributable to SPD is a pervasive difficulty in locating the origin of a sound. I can hear everything just fine; in fact, I have an extremely keen sense of hearing, but I often am unable to identify what the noise is or even what direction it’s coming from. This greatly complicates my ability identify and classify the sound, which heightens my anxiety because it’s not clearly evident if it’s innocuous or dangerous. (When in doubt, my brain errs on the side of caution and assumes danger.)

Last night, as the erratic banging continued, I pulled out my phone to try and put on a calming video for more engaging distraction. I noticed the alert on my weather app and quickly discovered that we were amid a hailstorm. Crisis averted.

I am much too light of a sleeper to sink back into sleep while the racket continued, so I relaxed and watched my show until the torrent was over and the more gentle rain lulled me back to sleep. A year ago, this type of unprecedented and unusual calamity would have sent me into an inconsolable tailspin. Even if I had rationally deduced the cause of the noise was innocuous as hail, it would have been nearly impossible to quell the initial panic and calm myself back to sleep. The hopes for additional rest would have been abandoned with the first weakening pitter-patter. The remaining hours of night would have been spent remembering the jarring noise, the resultant uneasiness, and the range of possible (and impossible) dangerous sources that could have generated such terror.

But not last night! Last night was evidence of my improved self-control, command over my previously-unbridled anxiety, and coping tools to manage startling situations.

Update on the Foot Saga

There are conflicting opinions about my foot. The doctor I’ve been seeing since February about it thinks it has not healed at all. Last Monday, in what can only be described as a bizarre and upsetting appointment, he told my husband and me that there is no evidence of healing and that surgery now is no longer an option. It was as if he was completely reneging on his prior assertions that surgery would be the only way to get it to heal, now he was saying because there was no healing, he was not going to do surgery. This paradox and contradiction completely confused both of us. Ben took the mature higher road and tried to ask very basic clarifying questions to ensure we understood his flip-flopped opinion. I sat there melting down with tears and sobs fretting that “I’ll be in a boot until I’m 40!” The surgeon completely ignored me and only shrugged at my husband’s questions. Ben, seeing that I was unraveling, said, “yeah so I mean if it doesn’t heal in another year or two you still wouldn’t do surgery to fix it?” He stopped shrugging, paused, then said, “maybe after another year.” Then he said he’d see us in another eight weeks and walked out. 

Like a barnacle on a sea rock, I clung to Ben and wailed about my frustrations and that the doctor didn’t want to help me. Although my response was emotionally over-dramatic, the stress of the appointment, diabolical nature of the doctor, and his unwillingness to answer our straightforward questions met at an overwhelming head. Even calm, cool, and virtually unperturbable Ben said, “this guy isn’t our doctor. He wouldn’t even explain anything.” Then like a mother duckling, he led me out of the office, trailing behind in residual sniffles and tears. 

I spent the rest of that afternoon trying again to find other viable specialist in the area. I made a couple of appointments and tried to table my anxiety and frustration for the rest of the day. Not easy. As usual, I could barely sleep.

I received a phone call from one of the offices I had contacted by Tuesday afternoon. She had a cancellation on Friday in Connecticut, a distance I felt reluctant (but able) to drive. Friday, I drove myself down and met with the new doctor. He had a vastly different opinion and equally different mannerisms. He took the time to explain things to me, actually evaluated my foot with clinical tests instead of solely relating on imaging reports, and a contrary treatment plan. “It’s basically healed,” he asserted. “There’s still some residual swelling in and around the bone but it’s essentially undetectable.” He encouraged me to start weaning out of the boot and resuming low level activities. He even said he thinks I could be back to running within a month, quite a contrast to the other surgeon’s prognosis which was, I wouldn’t be running again for a year or so, if at all. After all, he didn’t think running was a healthy activity for anyone. Armed with a more optimistic prognosis, I headed home in much better spirits. 

Unfortunately, that night while lying in bed, my foot had a more pronounced ache than normal. I had not even removed the boot for walking yet and it already seemed worse. As anxiety consumed my thoughts, we called the answering service (something I never do). To my pleasant surprise, the operator connected us with the doctor right away who assured me this is somewhat normal because he “really firmly manipulated it to assess the function and clinical symptoms.” He recommended icing it, taking anti-inflammatories, and keeping it in the boot the next three days and then resuming his purported plan. This made sense to me since we did do aggressive assessments after the conservative evaluation revealed nothing painful or abnormal. With the connective tissue disorder I have, it’s also normal to have tendon and ligament dysfunction coupled with extremely tight muscles, so he hypothesized that some of the calf raises and foot mobility against resistance had merely aggravated my muscles and tendons in the area.

I am optimistic about the treatment, care, and plan and delivered by the new doctor, but at the same time, my hesitation to remove the boat and start walking is rational. Not only has it taken so long to get to this precarious point of potentially healing, but the blatantly contradictory advice begs the question as to who is right and whom to trust. The answer lies within me. It is my responsibility and within my control to carry out whatever I deem best. It’s my foot and I’m the one who is experiencing the injury. More so than ever, I must listen to my body and pay close attention to my symptoms and needs. I plan to try carefully weaning out of the boot as instructed all while directly focused attention toward the area to monitor the physical response. I must strike an informed balance between heeding caution and restraining my anxiety so it doesn’t pollute my assessment. I pray that it has healed and can handle incrementally more sneaker time, but I am mentally prepared to dial it back if need be. This entire injury has been one of the most trying exercises of patience, maintaining faith and hope, and discipline. There have been more than many moments where I was ceded that I’d never walk again, let alone run. The future is still enshrouded in mystery, but the ominous gray cloud that used to conceal the bleak outlook portended, now looks lighter and brighter. My fears and worries are not gone, but they are better balanced by optimistic hopes for restored function, painless miles, and endless smiles.

The Hazards of Driving

Driving is one of my least favorite routine activities. For as much as people complain about the MTA in New York City, the extensive public transportation is one of the things I miss most about living there.

I have never been a good driver. Within the first several months of having my license, I ran a stop sign on a two-way stop street that I thought was a four-way stop and hit another car. Not only did I misread the right of way, I wouldn’t call what I did a “stop”; it was a yield at best. Thankfully, I was only moving about 15 miles per hour when I hit the other car, which didn’t have to stop, so she was traveling closer to 30. Bodily damages were minor, but the cars were not unscathed and my confidence in my ability to operate a motor vehicle vanished the moment that airbag inflated in my face. Rightfully so. As much as I’ve worked on trying to be a better driver, I have yet to feel competent and safe behind the wheel. My ADHD medication helps improve my focus, but it does little for reducing the anxiety that swells when I take the wheel because my problems driving safely are not solely products of inattentiveness.

The main issue seems to be my lack of proprioception and position sense. Similar to my hazards of walking, I have little awareness of where my body (or car) is in relation to other moving and stationary items. I crash into things multiple times per day with my shoulders, hips, or limbs. Door jambs, countertops, bushes, fences, boxes, you name it: I swipe it, catch my body on it, or topple it. One door frame in our old apartment was visibly darkened at the level of my shoulder from habitual collision. I have no appreciation for my body’s volume and especially none for its orientation relative to other items while I’m moving. This extends identically to being in a car, both as a passenger and driver. In the former, I’m just relegated to an anxious “backseat” driver, paranoid that my pilot has poor lane position and other cars are veering towards us as they pass. I hate highways for this reason. It always feels like the cars are not traveling parallel to me but closing in about to sideswipe us. I’ve learned that my best course of action is to not look out the window and stay immersed in some distraction phone process or reading material; the resultant carsickness is preferable (especially to the driver) to the incessant anxiety and frantic bracing of my limbs on the dashboard in preparation for a phantom collision. Over time, trust has been earned by most people who drive me, so I stifle my fears and avoid concerning myself with the passing traffic, even if it means missing the landscape.

Clearly when I’m driving, this is an impossible coping mechanism. I have to look. Not only do I still have the sense that cars or objects in my peripheral vision are coming towards me laterally, I also react accordingly, moving my vehicle unnecessarily and dangerously to one side or the other, often swiping things in the process. The right side of my car looks like it has race car stripe across its entire length: scars from the year I parked next to bushes that I collided with every time I pulled it in. There’s also a large dent on that side from hitting a dumpster. I can’t visualize my lane position and the moving cars around me capture my attention and distract me from staying attentive to the world through inside my windshield. On the highway, other cars often honk at me. I thought it was because I tend to drive obnoxiously slow (at least to Connecticut drivers) because I do have an appreciation for the fact that moving faster on the highway means my reaction time must be faster. They are honking because I allow my car to drift from the central position in the lane and encroach others, not because I’m not paying attention, but because I can’t tell where it is relative where it should be. I often think I’m correcting the position when I’m actually exacerbating it. I also noticed that I have to fight the urge to maintain focus ahead (where I’m going!).

My natural inclination seems to be to want to watch through the rearview mirror or side mirror. I have to fight my tendency to fixate on these targets and reroute my gaze appropriately ahead. As soon as I stop consciously reminding myself to look ahead, my eyes relax their focus back to their inappropriate mirror selection. Driving does not go well when you’re looking behind instead of ahead!

Lastly, it’s hard to control my thoughts while driving. For me, operating a car obviously requires dedicated attention but all of the rapidly presenting visual stimuli overwhelm my brain and monopolize its processing power. My OT has said this is an SPD issue and that many adults with SPD struggle with driving. My brain fixates on interpreting and organizing all of the visual cues coming in and it cannot filter out unnecessary “noise” (the color of that house, the number of people walking on the sidewalk, the license plate number of the oncoming car). All of the information is treated as equally important and it’s so superfluous that it gunks up the system and steals processing speed or mental RAM from appropriately tuning into and analyzing necessary cues. I imagine it’s analogous to setting a band pass filter to screen out certain frequencies of noise: a normal brain can filter out the clutter, the details of the moving surroundings, and gone in on the critical data. My brain completely lacks a filter and all visual messages flood in equally fast and loud, and are simply processed in the order in which they are received.

My eyes are like cameras set in sport mode, methodically snapping a series of pictures of my surroundings every fraction of a second, amassing enough stills that they could be viewed in succession and make a near seamless stop motion animation movie. The faster I drive, the faster my lens’ shutter speed and the higher the percentage of photos pile up. There’s no conceivable way to process the sheer volume that aggregate in even a single mile, let alone a trip of twenty or so and it’s frustratingly impossible to change my eyes’ setting to operate at a reasonably controlled rate. Essentially, my brain cannot keep pace with my eyes and I not only get a massive headache, but I fail to interpret or react to crucial main points in favor of useless details, should the details have been spotted first. Strangely, the visual inputs that evade processing when they inundate and overwhelm the processing speed don’t disappear. They seem to get stored in a holding area. Once visual information enters in a substantially slower rate (certainly when the drive is over but likely at the end of the day when my eyes close, ceasing the import of new input), each cue is systematically removed from storage and digested. I am bombarded with images of hundreds or thousands of images passed in the drive: useless details like car colors, passengers eating, bumper stickers, overgrown grass, a runner’s form as well information that should have caused adjustment in response to potholes, stop signs, traffic lights, brake lights ahead, a turn signal, etc. My mind will not welcome sleep until each picture is acknowledged. Too late.

There’s not an easy or favorable solution to this problem besides limiting the driving I do. I am extremely reluctant to drive, to the detriment of plans I’d like to make. I’m hoping that continued work in OT may improve my ability to filter out extraneous visual messages, but the interaction of factors that contribute to the hazard of my driving make it such that it’s unlikely that I’ll ever be a competent and secure driver. Eyes and a brain that collect and store endless visual information? I’ve got that covered!

 

 

All kidding aside, I severely restrict the amount of driving that I do, even though this is very limiting and sometimes prevents me from getting to places or seeing people that I’d like to visit. I know this greatly frustrates some people whom I’d like to see more, but thankfully, many are willing to visit me. I also like walking and biking and can often obtain rides when absolutely necessary.

 

Interview

Interviews rarely scare me. I’ve applied for hundreds of jobs over my working lifetime and gone on dozens of interviews. This is not hyperbole. One could argue this has largely been a waste of time, and sometimes it has been, but it has also helped me amass a ton of experience answering and asking important questions and diffusing the nervousness inherent in such meetings. Most of the time, I feel so practiced and familiar with the questions because they are often predictable ones I’ve previously tackled. I seem to be diabolically self-aware: uncannily so in certain aspects of my life and beyond blind (if such a condition exists) in others. Luckily, the former tends to apply to employment-related screening questions. Akin to how I study, catalog, and memorize social behaviors and expectations, I readily store and retrieve informative and eloquent responses to questions I’ve previously encountered. Even under pressure, I can grab from memory and regurgitate an appropriate response. For this reason, interviews don’t rattle me. Usually.

Yesterday, was an exception. I was confidently navigating a video conference interview for an interesting part-time job I happened upon in my current job search. (Even though I have a job that I love, I usually keep my eyes out for appealing and potentially viable opportunities because I’m an independent contractor so one of the few downsides of my position is its lack of security.) The questions were clear and I answered them comfortably. Admittedly, I did have more anxiety surrounding this interview than normal because the employer is a professional I’ve looked up to for a long-time, unbeknownst to him. His work is iconic in his field and he’s as much of a celebrity to me as Brad Pitt or Jennifer Aniston is to most (or whomever is hot these days!). I’ve followed his work religiously over the years and so to actually connect one-on-one, even in interview style, felt like an amazing and exciting opportunity. Of course, he knows nothing of me because I have no measurable public persona or impact, and certainly not one that would have spread to him. After the initial fangirl nerves reflective of being in the (virtual) presence of my guru were swallowed, I felt giddy and lucky to have the time to connect. This excitement lent a palpable energy to the conversation and somewhat of a natural rapport was quickly established. I figured this would bode well for my candidacy for the position because I seemed engaged, attentive, and genuinely eager, which I absolutely am. Then, things rapidly veered South: an unprecedented question.

“Tell me one thing about you that I can’t get from your resume or cover letter?”

It seemed like a fair, and interesting question, but it caught me off-guard. While I had been all too quick to answer the other predictable questions rather expressively and confidently, I took my first long pause and inserted the time filler, “hmmm…good question…” then repeated it as if asking myself the same thing.

I knew what I wanted to say (perhaps the elephant in the room of being autistic or my crippling PTSD and anxiety?), but I felt that would instantly quell my chances at the position and was too complicated to divulge without ostensibly trying to defend myself as still a capable worker (it’s amazing how the prevailing opinion is that these “issues” would make me a subpar employee).

It may have been the pause, the flash of panic that graced my face, or some tell sign I obliviously revealed earlier in the interview, but in my pause, he added, “you know, anything personal like a challenge or condition you face or something you’ve learned about yourself.” Does he already know? Is he goading me to self-identify? I wondered.  My face instantly glowed a hot red, like when your using the Paint app and select the “fill” or “dump paint can” icon and the entire figure is flooded with color. Don’t blow it, I pleaded. My entire operating vocabulary was suddenly locked up and the only words floating within reachable grasp were those that most hopeful job candidates would keep far from any resume: autism, anxiety, weirdo, PTSD, raped-and-ruined, depression. With each half-second that passed, I could feel my mutism mounting an aggressive offensive, so I picked the least “incriminating” of the limited options still available to me, “depression!” I blurted out as if it were the solution to the final puzzle on Wheel of Fortune. Say something else, I begged of my brain. “Uh, I have chronic depression.” That doesn’t sound good I thought. I was afraid to watch his reaction on the screen but forced myself to make momentary eye contact with his video. He shifted, perhaps uncomfortably, and waited to see if I was going to say more. Nothing. “Oh,” he added, as if hearing awkward news on a first date when you’re trying to be polite but secretly disappointed or disgusted.

The energy from the entire conversation plummeted and was swallowed by each of our computer screens, leaving a vacuous and stale hum of the remote connection. Whereas before, we were volleying eloquent ideas and relaying enthusiasm with each pass, the silence now was stifling. I seemed entirely unable to even formulate a coherent sentence to thank him for his time and end the call. I considered simply x-ing out of the window and blaming technical difficulties, but God threw me a bone. I took a few deep breaths, aware that my back was now sweating under my sweater, and found my voice: “yeah, I have chronic clinical depression and it’s something I battle on basically a daily basis, but I’ve learned to cope and keep it at manageable levels.” Good start, I thought. “It’s like any problem. It’s simply a challenge that I’ve been dealt but it makes me stronger and as I’ve matured, I’ve discovered productive ways to handle it.” Give an example, I encouraged myself. “Like my dog,” I offered. “I’ve found so much joy in spending time with her and I feel like I connect with her in a meaningful way. There’s something very grounding about pets and caring for her brings me happiness.” Call in the generators. It was as if I summoned the energy back and resuscitated the conversation enough to at least give it a moonshot of a surviving chance. “I love my dog too,” he offered. “What kind do you have?” “A golden retriever!” He said. “Awesome!” I said, which, although not the most prolific response, was better than nothing.

Shortly after, we wrapped up the meeting in a slightly less awkward fashion. What I figured was just going to be a rote interview, turned into more of a stressful stimulus that I envisioned. My uncharacteristic nervousness left me surprisingly sweaty and I had to rinse off and completely change outfits before moving on to the next thing!

The whole experience made me wonder why it’s so hard to share personal information about the struggles we face. Everyone has some challenge, so I’d think it would feel more natural, or at least less mortifying and self-sabotaging, to admit them. I partially blame my self-esteem and imagine it’s never as opportunity-killing as I imagine it to be, but I think the stigma surrounding mental illnesses and autism is still a reality and such information can hurt one’s chances for a job or a second date or whatever the objective might be (save for therapy?). I have vowed to be more upfront and try to increase awareness, so I’m hoping that if this job doesn’t pan out, or even if it does, down the road, I can be more open with any self-identifying questions and not fret so frantically about the implications. Especially if I wait until I’ve demonstrated my value and command of the position, it shouldn’t hurt my reputation and instead, hopefully would dispel some of the incorrect perceived weaknesses or conflicts with my viability and merit as an employee and person.

 

Stunned into Silence

My selective mutism completely overtook me yesterday. I went several hours without the ability to speak. The little voice I was eventually able to conjure up was so feeble and small, it was like a hushed mother trying not to wake the baby in her arms. This time, it wasn’t directly tied to a medical appointment, although I did have one later in the day that I seemed nervous about. For this reason, I’m not sure that it was entirely separate and more likely, my tension and anxiety in anticipation of the appointment played a role. Still, it typically hasn’t been the case that I lose my voice prior to an appointment. Instead, I’m usually quite chatty until I enter the waiting room, and effectively smothered like a fire extinguished by a woolen blanket. 

The precipitating event yesterday seemed to be an emotional explosion in the morning. After trying repeatedly and unsuccessfully to reach Ben via his phone, I panicked that something was wrong with him and adrenaline coursed through every last millimeter of vasculature in my body. This call was already one fueled by stress because I was having debilitating dizzy spells and so I was contacting him for support. When he didn’t answer after many, many attempts, my irrational brain immediately jumped to worst case scenario stuff (car accident, bad fall, etc.) and skipped all of the more likely and less dire potential causes for his lack of reachability. (He just inadvertently fell asleep.) In fact, these sorts of realistic possibilities were not even considered for a fleeting moment; my trauma brain took over and immediately assumed the worst and only the worst.

It wasn’t until early this morning that I was able to connect the dots and make sense of that. I remember exchanging a couple of really helpful emails with one of my sisters last year about PTSD and emotional fallout from traumatic events. I had reached out to her for advice about my problems with PTSD after the attack because she had survived a bike accident years earlier, and while quite different in nature, still certainly a traumatic event to overcome. I correctly figured that she might have some tips or at least solidarity with some of the emotional demons I was facing. She told me that she had very little PTSD and was pretty much over it now but that she still would get incredibly mad at her own husband when he was unreachable, even though she couldn’t draw any connections between not being able to communicate with him and her accident. As I lay on the rug this morning thinking about things like I do every morning, trying to meditate and relax, my sister’s words suddenly helped me understand what went on with much more clarity.

Not only do I hate not being able to reach Ben if I feel like I need him, but it instantly transports me back to the first moments after I getting up from my attack because after I attended to my immediate physical problems, I sought out my phone, which had been tried from my hands and flung behind the couch, to call Ben. I called. No answer. I called. No answer. Then he texted to remind me that he was out to lunch with friends and he would contact me when he got back to the office. Instead of asserting the urgency and severity of my needs, I just felt rejected and alone. Of course, had I told him that I just got brutally attacked and raped, he would’ve been home or at the nearest hospital to meet me, as soon as the first available cab could wiz him there. I blame the complete shock I was in, the searing pain, the greatest depths of fear and disgust I had ever experienced on my inability to voice my needs. My therapist has since told me that this is a fairly normal post-traumatic response. I simply wrote back “fine,” and by the time he did call me back, I was completely consumed by silence. I just texted back that I no longer want to talk, which was technically a lie because I did want to talk but I was entirely unable to. It’s fair to say I went into a hibernation of sorts after that. I completely disconnected in all sorts of ways from him and everyone else in my life at that time for several days. Needless to say, I have more than just anxiety at face value when I can’t reach Ben when I don’t feel well; it’s inseparable from the horrific memories surrounding that dreadful day. 

Anyway, after I was finally able to wake him with call after call, I exploded at him in a tirade of tears and shouts about how he terrified me and I thought something happened to him; although unfair and irrational, I spoke the truth and my feelings were deeply seeded and real. 

The entire outburst lasted all but a couple of minutes, but it relegated me to that of a meek nonverbal mouse for six hours. I felt like an outline of a human form, one that could be blown into scattered fragments like a summer dandelion puff. Even when I walked the dog, my thoughts were just mouthed in inaudible configurations of the words I intended to say and my muscles felt melted along my bones like the feeling that only comes after being physically spent at the end of a hard race. 

By mid afternoon, I was able coax out a small voice, which was a relief because I rarely feel unable to speak for so long. I think it’s an emotional issue more so than a physical one, my autism therapist says these sorts of “shutdowns” can happen.

Even though I’m often upset and juggling a lot of demanding issues, I rarely lose my cool. I’m one of the least confrontational people I know and almost always internalize fear, anger, hurt, or overwhelm instead of letting it surge out. This unfamiliarity adds to my discomfort and shock when it does escape in a demonstrable way. I thrive on stability and predictability, and any sort of fitful anger or hysteria uproots my feeling of control, even if it is a farce in reality and unhealthy to bottle up. 

The most difficult part of the experience was explaining myself to Ben. Although I don’t concede that my exaggerated response to not reaching him was justified, I do now acknowledge why I have this post-traumatic reaction. My sister is one of the most even-keeled and logical people I know, so if even she has had similar irrational behavior, it further provides me understanding of my own panic.

The mutism must be the way my mind recoils in an attempt to restore equanimity after an emotional torrent like the echoes of deafening silence after a massive explosion. It’s an uncomfortable place because I’m the silence, I cannot express my thoughts or needs. In the silence, my brain runs discounted showings of the memories of the attack, flooding “TV screens” in my mind with simultaneous screenings of lived trauma. The verbal silence seemingly opens a permissive and inviting gate for the memories I try to suppress to air on full blast enshrouding me in the disgusting fearful garb that cloaked my entire conscious and unconscious mind post-attack. Why can’t I burn these memories and watch them rise in lofts of ash far up into the sky? Why can’t I always operate with self-control, logic, patience, and calm? When will my resilience become foolproof and my strength no longer be an act? I can’t answer these questions and I’m guessing that the answer may not be what I hope it to be, that’s why it’s more productive to focus on what I can change and the progress I have made. Yesterday’s outburst was not progress but unpacking its roots was a substantial step forward. Before today, I had no concrete grasp on what was precipitating such unduly magnified reactions. I speak frequently of wanting all of this PTSD stuff to vanish, and I do, but I’m sure there are invaluable lessons and some purpose that I am deriving from this place of pain and this space in my life. I will do my best to trust in the process of my healing, the outward expansion and inward growth that I will glean, and hope that each experience and tribulation is like a crucial piece of the foundation or scaffold from which my “building” as a human becomes better, stronger, and more useful to those around me. 

Phone

To add to my string of recent falls, I took yet another tumble down some of the stairs yesterday. Thankfully this time, I didn’t cause much bodily harm although I did crack my cellphone screen. Of course, this is certainly a better trade in many ways, I found myself being just as upset, if not more so. I know that people talk about technology addictions, especially in terms of some people’s attachments to their cellphone, and I’m probably in that camp of people. I can’t really surmise why most people become obsessed because frankly, I don’t have any friends who are to ask. My husband still uses a flip phone and no one else’s phone in my family seems to be a permanent extension on their hand like it is in my case. For me, my phone is my world. It is my way to connect to other people and, in its own right, it is my friend. Since I work at a home office and have no local friends, it is the only vehicle through which I communicate with people and the outside world. I know this is abnormal and unhealthy, but it is my reality. My phone is my anti-anxiety medication; when I don’t feel well, I remind myself of the outline of my phone in my pocket and I feel assured that I can get help if I need it. When I was attacked, as soon as he grabbed me from behind and threw me to the ground, he ripped my phone out of my hand and flung it across the room. When he silenced me, I had no means to communicate that I needed help except silent prayer in my mind. Four days after the attack, I was in separable from my cell phone. My hand was constantly on it, even when it was in my pocket, under my pillow, or in the bathroom.

This phone has been with me for nearly three years, which, given my carelessness, propensity to fall or damage things, and its constant use, is remarkable. Maybe it is the length and depth of this “relationship” that, ashamedly, makes me mourn the breaking of this device.

I am fully aware that phone is not a real friend, and to even remotely consider it as such is quite pathetic. I want to connect with people. I want to have more friends. I’d love to have someone who called me to meet up and hang out. This is a process though and an arduous and unnatural one (for me) at that. For now, I have a handful of good friends that I text or call daily. These people, for the most part, inhabit fragments of my “old” lives: times when I was surrounded by more people, forced to be more social because of work or habitat, or was less encumbered by physical and mental obstacles. (Chronic disease and my near inability to drive certainly hampers my ability to participate in normal social events.) These people have hung with me through changes, challenges, and miscommunications. They have allowed me to grow as a friend and they have ridden out the bumps I’ve made as I’ve learned to be a better friend. I am blessed to have a place in their hearts and I honor and nurture the prominent residence they have in mine.

I am a member of several online support groups for adults on the spectrum. I connect with these virtual friends through my phone. If people were mapped in Venn diagram, the overlapped regions are inherently much larger between my circle and the circles representing many of the other group members than my circle and many neurotypical peers whom I want to befriend.

Like sharing a common culture, language, or customs, I’m more closely “related” to other spectrum-dwelling adults in many ways, and the reciprocity of understanding one another is both easier and more expansive than between me and a typical people of “normal” neurology. Although I am so glad to have access to an artistic community thanks to technological and communicative advancements provided by the Internet, I can’t help but be honest and admit that I’d still really like friends in the flesh who I actually spend time with. Their neurology is unimportant to me as long as they are good people. Even though an autism diagnosis is much more common these days than even twenty years ago, obviously, the majority of the general population is not on the spectrum so it’s more likely to find neurotypical friends. I need to be able to bridge the gap between these two worlds. While I have done this successfully before, it takes time and effort (and compassion and patience of the other party’s part!).

Far and above the challenges posed by my social, emotional, and physical problems, I believe the biggest hurdle to clear making friends is the schedule I keep. Essentially, it’s like that of a shift worker, working second shift. Even for those social butterflies who keep such a schedule, finding friends and participating in social activities is nearly impossible, especially if you don’t live in the city and are isolated in a small town. New York City may be the city that never sleeps but western Mass, although wonderful in many ways, gets plenty of sleep. My body operates on asynchronously with most other people. I’m up before 3am and done for the day around 5pm. I’ve tried coercing it into a more “normal” routine, but that just wreaks havoc on every physical and mental process. Even with Benadryl and nights of not falling asleep, I cannot sleep past 4am. I can then try to remain in as much of a sensory-depriving environment as logistically feasible to keep my overload below threshold, but even so, it’s virtually impossible to have the physical and mental stamina to persist past 6pm before I must be prostrate to the couch with no movement or talking. My brain runs nonstop in high-gear all day and I have yet to tame her incessant work; I can consider and effectively work on many things at one time, but then I run out of legs for the end of the race. I’m a relay of runners who ran their lap together around the track at full speed instead of passing the baton for each individual leg. I’m embarrassingly exhaustible; I’m a racecar on full throttle with no brakes. All this is to say, when most people head out the door for their morning commute, I’ve already put in four or five hours of work, and when almost everyone is clocking out for the day and are finally available to hang out, I’m crawling into bed or nearly comatose on the couch. The only groups of people I seem to overlap with are stay-at-home parents, the elderly or retired). My small town seems to lack any sort of daytime programming or activities for anyone outside of the aforementioned groups, and truth be told, I’m working most of the day anyway, even if I do have some scheduling flexibility. Despite this scheduling incompatibility, I keep looking and hoping to find some venue to meet in person and cultivate friendships. It’s easy to resign my socially-avoidant self to ongoing isolation and fall prey to a myriad of excuses, but I’m actually rather disciplined in researching options, trying to get out there, and simply recognizing the obstacles for the purpose of strategically mounting an effective offense rather than ceding to their debility. At the end of the day, I need to respect my deal breakers (in terms of my work scheduling obligations and energy needs) but compromise on every possible manipulatable variable to try to make it work. My mom always says I find these really interesting opportunities and I do because I’m willing to cast a really wide net; you never know what will pan out so it can only be fortuitous to keep an open mind and religiously seek opportunities for whatever it is you desire.

I am grateful that I live in a time of interconnectedness and communities engaged through technology. In many ways, the Internet has made the world smaller by forging bonds across great distances. My remote friends and online social support network keep me from being entirely marginalized and allow me to hone my relationship skills and understand myself better and more compassionately. It somewhat removes the “freak” or “loner” label that I’d otherwise tattoo onto myself (instead it’s just a removable sticker). Perhaps I’m too addicted to my phone and I recognize that it’s far healthier to have in vivo friendships, but for where I am now in my life, it’s an indispensable tool and companion, a device that teaches me, alleviates my anxiety, and connects me to others and my world. I hope my new one further guides me to forge friendships and that more of the “lifetime minutes” for calls sent and received are occupied by quick conversations to establish plans with others, then it will navigate me to the meetup and get stowed in my pocket while I make new memories with new friends.

 

The Power of Attitude

As a young child, I was remarkably upbeat, happy, optimistic, and hopeful about my future and that of the world. Anything seemed possible and I had wholehearted confidence in my ability to transpire my dreams into my reality. Mostly, I credit my parents for fostering this attitude of wonder and self-assurance; they provided me with ample opportunities to explore the world and my capabilities and never set boundaries or limitations on what I was capable of, even if they had their own (realistic) doubts. I certainly had my fair share of physical and emotional falls and fails, but they never seemed to set me back with much permanent or lasting impact. I had a lot of behavioral problems, particularly in my first years of school and in social situations that my older sisters never displayed, and to say that I presented more of a parenting challenge throughout my entire childhood is a gross understatement. In hindsight, it’s clear that much of my misbehavior, rambunctiousness, and hair-pulling frustrating confusion was a product of my undiagnosed autism and sensory processing disorder. At the time, my hyperactivity, finicky-ness, and even “bratty and immature” behavior was attributed to ADHD and my position as the youngest of three girls. Needless to say, the routine misdemeanors, punishment, timeouts at school, less-than-stellar report card marks for behavior (and penmanship) did little to curtail my mojo and I remained a spunky, relentlessly positive kid.

Something began to shift in the months before my tenth birthday. As if double-digits inherently ushered in the cessation of innocence, verve, and faith in oneself and the world, my mindset and affect began to dramatically shift. In the manner in which a windup toy peters out as the duration of its chatter and clatter lengthens after the initial spinning charge, my zest, vigor, and sunny outlook faded in favor of a restrained, timid demeanor.* Doubt replaced hope, worry and anxiety trumped my carefree nature, pessimism extinguished optimism, and my self-esteem plummeted. Within a few months, depression clouded out the very happiness and joy that had previously bestowed upon me the nickname “the happiest girl in the world,” used lovingly, but earnestly, by my dad. A switch had been flipped and my internal world, which colored my external one, changed.

As with most things which are rarely black or white, solely good or bad, some changes brought on by this metamorphosis were beneficial: my behavior, now so reserved, no longer landed me at the back table or time-out position at school, instead, teachers remarked that I was well-behaved. The more I restrained my body and physical hyperactivity and conformed to the expectations and qualities of a mature and “good” student, the more wildly and feverishly my brain ran. There was a constant barrage of anxieties, questions, troubles, fears, and even panic. Sure, there were also hopes and constructive thoughts, mulling over things learned in school, observations made out and about, and intellectual curiosities much like those that characterized my kid brain, but it became harder to hear these over the sheer volume and strength of the pessimistic thought reel. Little did teachers know that as I sat there studiously at my desk, the littlest one in the class with a big brain and bright responses to assignments, I was filled with internal angst, confusion, and sadness. My “proper” behavior was actually just paralysis induced by depression devouring my energy and ubiquitous pensive concerns. Shortly after, I developed an eating disorder that proved to be a formidable foe for the next eight years. The depression and anxiety fueled the anorexia, which in turn, sunk me into more severe depression and calamitous anxiety.

I wish I could say that some other momentous birthday or other occasion caused the same radical about-face in my outlook as did turning ten, but truthfully, nothing had been as exorbitantly formative in changing me. With that said, particularly in recent years, I have found a better balance and allowed some of that positivity, hope, and verve to weasel its way back into my psyche and shine through the constant cacophony of worries, bleak and dispirited thoughts, and emotional pain. My inner strength and confidence have mounted as I’ve triumphed over difficulties and become a curious and dedicated student of myself. For me, self-awareness has had an instrumental role in increasing self-compassion. I’ve even surprised myself in the authenticity of my mental fortitude and strong drive to seek and recognize the silver linings in spite of some tremendous adversities I’ve faced in recent years. I’m proud of things that I’ve overcome and the resilience of my positive attitude when it would be so understandable to completely crumble.

Some days, in accordance with the idiom “fake it ’til you make it,” the optimism and emotional fortitude is somewhat of an act, a tiring attempt to feign stability and tenacity. Although exhausting, there does seem to be some payback from this practice, but thankfully, sometimes the attitude is genuine. My foot injury is an example of the former turning into the latter. After it seems like surgery was in evitable, I experienced slight improvement in the pain and swelling after weeks of nonexistent progress. I have long heard that having a good attitude through illness and injury is scientifically proven to improve healing and perhaps my desire to avoid surgery was so primal and deep that I truly convinced myself that my foot was healing. It’s not. I have objective evidence from imaging studies that fail to demonstrate an iota of progress; it’s exactly the same as it was four months ago. At first, I couldn’t believe the results; I was so assured it was physically healing because my conviction in maiming a positive outlook became so powerful. I cancelled the postponed surgery date in favor for the conservative route.

Once the initial shock delivered by the MRI’s report on the stagnant state of my foot, I sat with my feelings. In the quiet of the predawn hours where all my clearest thoughts reside, my pride and optimism stripped away, I felt the throbbing pain, the familiar ache from the initial months of injury. The pain had not just returned, it had never really gone away. I had just become committed to silencing it in hopes of encouraging my body to actually resolve it. It looks like I will need the surgery after all.

Of course, I am very disappointed I will have to have the surgery and because I have medical anxiety, I am certainly anxious for that day. However, although I was mad at myself a couple of days ago for my inability to honestly assess the pain and progress of my foot, I choose to remain proud. It’s not easy to be hopeful and positive in the face of a bad injury, let alone the larger obstacles I have faced. As the sands of hopefulness and confidence ran out of the hourglass that ushered in age ten, I lost so much more than just the innocence of childhood. It’s taken two decades to build back some of what I’ve lost and so I will honor and admire all of the positive attitude triumphs, enthusiasm, and growth mindset moments that I can cultivate.

 

*The reason that turning ten served as an impetus for such change is complicated and I’m not sure I fully understand it, but I will attempt to evaluate it at a subsequent time.