Keeping Things in Perspective

Depressing. That’s the single word I’d use to describe yesterday’s medical appointment. When I saw him a few weeks ago, although I also received what could be considered unfavorable diagnoses, the appointment was couched in more hope, a possibility of answers and treatment. This time, the diagnoses and their ramifications hung naked, with no silver lining disguise. By definition, chronic illnesses or disorders persist; they do not resolve and many, by their very nature, do not have cures or effective treatment. It’s more about managing the symptoms, mitigating them if lucky, and attaining the highest quality of life possible. On good days, when wearing positive attitude rose-colored glasses, this feels like enough, a pill, though big and uncomfortable, is possible to swallow. On other “weaker” days when the pain is just too obnoxiously loud to be ignored, the sunny attitude is stripped away, leaving what actually remains, the somber outcome, the harsh reality. Most weeks are populated by both emotional responses, although in the weeks that are especially peppered with more excruciating and frequently debilitating symptoms, the balance tips in favor of viewing the bleak outlook with the pessimism that it rightly warrants.

The reality and prognosis painted in yesterday’s appointment was particularly disheartening because the first appointment presented the vague description of my health problems in sort of an intangible dotted outline of what “could” (but hopefully wouldn’t) be. Yesterday, the outline was traced in permanent black marker, with all the gaps and white spaces filled in with distressingly boldly somber colors. I left feeling unusual clarity and unusual hopelessness and sadness. Maybe it was the unrelenting rain and March-like temperatures despite the calendar’s insistence that it’s early June, but I felt literally and figuratively cold, wet, and despondent. I couldn’t even form words in my head, just a feeling of endless grayness, swirling around a vacant lot.

It’s easier to imagine a more optimistic picture when things are presented hypothetically. When diagnostic tests objectively present undeniable data that solidify the hypothetical into reality, the important keystone maintaining that hope is removed, and it all comes crumbling down. Although it’s always possible to view the same situation with a different (and more upbeat) attitude, in the former pre-information stage, it’s a genuine optimism, and in the latter, it is feigned, which takes endurance to uphold.

I’ve faced many disappointments and challenges over the years that I was able to overcome or at least tolerate as my new “normal,” like absorbing a small ball of black clay into the multi-colored amorphous blob representing my existence. At first, it adheres to the surface, marring the appearance with an unsightly blemish, but after a few days and continually rolling, folding, and spreading, the blemish is adopted and blended in to the whole. I have built a fortress to shield my flame of persistence and hope from the resounding winds of pessimism, blowing continuously from varying angles to try and extinguish its glow. I will not resign my efforts to hope for the best and put on a brave front. Bad news is just an impetus to learn more, seek alternatives, and be grateful for what I do have. I’m blessed. Nothing I face is terminal; I’m not dying, and that’s more than many people can say. My conditions may be degenerative and manifested in more substantial physiological damage than we initially thought, but all that really means is more joint and muscle pain and less musculoskeletal and GI function. At the beginning of the day or the end, this is still a way more privileged, lucky, and healthy life than many people inherit. How truly thankful I am to have been born into my life, with the parents, family, friends, circumstances, opportunities, safety, and blessings that I am so abundantly handed every day. Any setback I encounter is surely a dream for someone else in her battle in this world. I fight for myself to be strong and that becomes much easier when I view every breath as a gift and every circumstance as a blessing. So maybe I choose to edit that first word. Depressing. I’m not quite ready to genuinely call it neutral, but for now, I’ll settle for disappointing. But, I can work with that.